Sand removal needed for natural gas storage

Problem
PB Energy in Beaumont, Texas, was preparing a salt dome cavern so it could be used to store natural gas. But removing the salt resulted in heavy brine water mixed with sand. The sand had to be removed prior to re-injecting the brine water into disposal wells so those wells didn’t clog, creating the need for drilling more wells. Screen filters and settling ponds were used in the past, but both required high maintenance and took up too much real estate. A better solution was needed.

Solution
PB Energy decided on three LAKOS Tri-Sep JPX Separator combinations (nine separators total) to separate the sand from the brine water. The zero-maintenance filtration systems were installed at the full stream rate of 800 to 5,000 gpm. Each separator was equipped with fully automatic pneumatic pinch valves that were set to purge into a concrete holding pit.

Result
Since installing the systems, the entire sand removal process has worked flawlessly, without routine maintenance. PB Energy reported positive results, praising the system’s efficiency and cost effectiveness. 800/344-7205; www.lakos.com.

New heater treater used to increase efficiency

Problem
A Texas company had been experiencing quality issues in their supply of heater treaters and pressure vessels. Leaking vessels, EPA concerns, non-code construction and a few near-misses on safety issues had them looking for a solution.

Solution
The company was looking for a coded shop, specializing in pressure vessels, to build large-volume heater treaters, separators, PRIs, and to repair existing coded equipment. In collaboration with TWI Oilfield Fabrication — certified for pressure vessels with both the ASME ‘U’ Stamp and NBBI ‘R’ Stamp — the vessels were constructed.

Result
These Colorado-made vessels are now in service in Texas, used by the customer as a benchmark for ongoing vessel purchases. 970/440-3084; www.twi-fab.com.

Water filtration system optimizes operations, eliminating over 1,000 truck trips

Problem
To minimize the use of freshwater and subsequent wastewater disposal during coil operations in the Williston Basin in Stanley, N.D., a large operator required a reliable system to reuse drillout water and recover produced oil. With production schedules to meet, the operator could not be delayed by water shortages, and the only answer was large stockpiles of fresh water, and many trucks at the ready to continually haul water.

Solution
Resirkulere USA recommended a mobile well site water treatment. Requiring less than 1,000 square feet, the Magic Tank system was set up inline with existing flowback operations. By utilizing an onboard transfer pump, personnel began pumping trash fluid. Once the system achieved its initial 400 bbl prime, the system began returning clean water, filtered to 25 microns to the coil-tubing operator for reuse. In the same moment the water began returning from the system for filtration, fresh, clean oil began flowing through the oil recovery contingent.

Result
On this first job, 500 bbls of recoverable oil were saved. As much as 2,000 bbls of oil have been recovered over subsequent four-day drillouts. Operators are able to reduce in-field and long-haul truck traffic, achieve on-site recycling of flow-back water for drilling and completion operations, and reduce disposal costs of trash water and acquisition of freshwater for drillouts by as much as 75 percent. 701/852-8029; www.resirkulere.com.


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